Jan 15 • 1HR 22M

The House of Dudley with Dr Joanne Paul

Historian Interview

 
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Philippa Brewell
Exploring British History through stories, people and places.
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Three generations of Dudley’s served three generations of Tudor monarchs, their fortunes, and legacies, were intertwined and often interdependent. The rise from unknown to right-hand man to the King, left Edmund Dudley in a precarious position following the death of his master, Henry VII, and was beheaded under his son, the next Tudor king, Henry VIII. The concern Henry VIII had by being associated with Edmund Dudley was not mirrored in his concern for spending the spoils of the activities for which Edmund had gained that unpopularity, however. The family position and royal favour was regained under Edmund’s son, John Dudley, through loyal service on, and off, the battlefield. Service that was to cost John dearly, with the loss of his eldest son, Henry. John’s long friendship with Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset put John in ever greater positions at court and even close to the boy-king, Edward VI. When Edward VI devised his ‘Device for the Succession’, John was by his side. Whether to implement it to Edward’s wishes or manipulate the plan to his own ends, remains a contentious debate. John was also to lose his head, as was his son Guildford when they fell on the wrong side of history with their active role in supporting Jane Grey’s (Jane Grey was married to Guildford Dudley) claim to the throne of England against that of Mary Tudor. Mary’s premature death brought the final Tudor monarch to the throne, her half-sister, Elizabeth I. The remaining Dudley brothers had been somewhat restored to favour under the patronage of the late Queen’s husband, Philip of Spain. However, the friendship of Robert Dudley and Elizabeth was already established when she succeeded her sister and Robert’s star rose so high that he was even in a position to ask for the Queen’s hand in marriage. The marriage was never to be and it is with Elizabeth and Robert that both the Tudor and Dudley lines, respectively, died out. For an eye-opening and fascinating new take on the Dudleys and the Tudors, watch my interview with Dr Joanne Paul. The stories she uncovered for this book shine new light on a topic that was thought to have been exhausted, but not so!

Three generations of Dudley’s served three generations of Tudor monarchs, their fortunes, and legacies, were intertwined and often interdependent. The rise from unknown to right-hand man to the King, left Edmund Dudley in a precarious position following the death of his master, Henry VII, and was beheaded under his son, the next Tudor king, Henry VIII. The concern Henry VIII had by being associated with Edmund Dudley was not mirrored in his concern for spending the spoils of the activities for which Edmund had gained that unpopularity, however. The family position and royal favour was regained under Edmund’s son, John Dudley, through loyal service on, and off, the battlefield. Service that was to cost John dearly, with the loss of his eldest son, Henry. John’s long friendship with Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset put John in ever greater positions at court and even close to the boy-king, Edward VI. When Edward VI devised his ‘Device for the Succession’, John was by his side. Whether to implement it to Edward’s wishes or manipulate the plan to his own ends, remains a contentious debate. John was also to lose his head, as was his son Guildford when they fell on the wrong side of history with their active role in supporting Jane Grey’s (Jane Grey was married to Guildford Dudley) claim to the throne of England against that of Mary Tudor. Mary’s premature death brought the final Tudor monarch to the throne, her half-sister, Elizabeth I. The remaining Dudley brothers had been somewhat restored to favour under the patronage of the late Queen’s husband, Philip of Spain. However, the friendship of Robert Dudley and Elizabeth was already established when she succeeded her sister and Robert’s star rose so high that he was even in a position to ask for the Queen’s hand in marriage. The marriage was never to be and it is with Elizabeth and Robert that both the Tudor and Dudley lines, respectively, died out. For an eye-opening and fascinating new take on the Dudleys and the Tudors, watch my interview with Dr Joanne Paul. The stories she uncovered for this book shine new light on a topic that was thought to have been exhausted, but not so!

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Find Dr Joanne Paul at: https://joannepaul.com/ Twitter: @ joanne_paul_ Instagram: @ drjoannepaul

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